YESTERDAY'S TOWNS

HOWDY, MY NAME IS BILL STRONG, I'LL BE YOUR "24 HOUR MAN", ROUTING YOU INTO THE PAST TO SEE WHAT THE CIRCUS WAS IN DAYS GONE BY. IF YOU'RE LIKE ME, AND MISS WHAT IT USED TO BE, THEN COME ON ALONG AS WE GO DOWN THE ROAD FOLLOWING THE ARROWS BACKWARDS, TO "YESTERDAY'S TOWNS"! IF YOU HAVE CIRCUS RELATED PICTURES YOU WOULD LIKE POSTED, SEND THEM TO,,,,yesterday1@verizon.net,,,,AND WE WILL TRY TO FIT THEM IN. "24 HOUR MAN" WILL HAVE THE FINAL DECISION ON POSTING.

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Location: GIBSONTON, FLORIDA, United States

Three years at CWM made me a real traditionalist, and I keep remembering Bob Parkinson saying, "I want the people to see what the circus used to be, not what it is today. That's what this site is about!

Saturday, November 15, 2008

POSTERS: BIG CATS

Comment from Chris Berry,
The Hamid-Morton poster (1940) is a great use of an original Cole Bros artwork produced by the Erie Litho Co. This same art was used when Clyde Beatty was on Russell Bros, a few Shrine circus dates - and even his own Clyde Beatty Circus.










BEL GEDDES TRADEMARK
Comment from Chris Berry,
If you look closely at the two leopard head posters you will see that they are similar but not identical. The one on the top was designed by the Bel Geddes studios in 1941 as part of John Ringling North's bold redesign of the show. The rehashed piece was actually one of two of the last posters produced by Cincinnati's Strobridge Litho Co in 1954. The poster doesn't say Strobridge on it - but it does have the Printer Union "bug" in the corner for the Strobridge shop. That design - with both a green and red background - was used by Ringling-Barnum until the early 1970s.




1 Comments:

Blogger Chris Berry said...

The Hamid-Morton poster (1940) is a great use of an original Cole Bros artwork produced by the Erie Litho Co. This same art was used when Clyde Beatty was on Russell Bros, a few Shrine circus dates - and even his own Clyde Beatty Circus.

If you look closely at the two leopard head posters you will see that they are similar but not identical. The one on the top was designed by the Bel Geddes studios in 1941 as part of John Ringling North's bold redesign of the show. The rehashed piece was actually one of two of the last posters produced by Cincinnati's Strobridge Litho Co in 1954. The poster doesn't say Strobridge on it - but it does have the Printer Union "bug" in the corner for the Strobridge shop. That design - with both a green and red background - was used by Ringling-Barnum until the early 1970s.

11/21/2008 2:51 PM  

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